17 Days
Duration
Nov 20, 2022
Dates
Yes
Meals
Greece/Dubai
Location

Price starting from: $9,167 per person. Prices are in CAD, per person, based on double occupancy.
(for US$ rate call 1-855-824-2495)
*Rates shown were available when posted and can change when bookings get confirmed. Please call (778-989-7876 or till-free 1-855 -824-2495) to check availability

Seabourn Encore is as strikingly beautiful and as excitingly innovative as any Seabourn has ever debuted. She crowns a fleet of luxury cruise ships that is already the newest, most modern and most acclaimed in the ultra-luxury segment.

INCLUDED A full-length window
Glass door to private veranda
Comfortable living area
Queen-size bed or two twin beds
Dining table for two
Walk-in closet
Interactive flat-screen television with music and movies
Fully stocked bar and refrigerator
Makeup vanity
Spacious bathroom with separate tub and shower

Please call 1-855-824-2495 to request a quote.
ST-22004

1

Agios Nikolaos, Crete, Greece


This charming village of white houses climbing up the slopes is beautifully situated on the sparkling Gulf of Mirabello. The attractive Venetian harbor is surrounded by restaurants, outdoor cafes and clusters of shops selling everything from necessities to souvenirs. The ship docks in the center of town, and you are able to wander at will and enjoy the atmosphere of Crete’s foremost resort.
2

Day At Sea


3

Haifa (Tel Aviv), Israel


Situated on the slopes of Mount Carmel, along one of the most beautiful bays on the Mediterranean coast, Haifa is Israel’s primary port. It also serves as an important gateway to the biblical and historical sites of this sacred land. Although the origin of Haifa is obscure, its name appears for the first time in the 3rd century A.D. in Talmudic literature. Over the years, Crusaders, Arabs, Turks and the British occupied the city. Today, this bustling city possesses the nation’s largest industries, several important museums and the respected Haifa Technical Institute. It is also the world center of the Baha’i faith, symbolized by a beautiful gold-domed shrine.
4

Ashdod (Jerusalem), Israel


The largest port in Israel, Ashdod is a gateway to Jerusalem, the 5,000-year-old walled city that is considered sacred to more than a third of the people on Earth. Numerous sites exist nearby, including the Jewish sacred Western Wall, and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre said to be the site of Calvary and to contain a piece of the true cross. Meander along the seaside promenade, or dip your toes in the Dead Sea waters, long known for their health benefits. Visit the Bar-Gera Museum to view a collection of art by artists who were either banned or persecuted by the Nazis and other fascist governments. The Yad Vashem Memorial Museum is dedicated to the six million Jews who lost their lives during the Holocaust.
5

Enter Suez Canal At Port Said


A canal linking the Mediterranean and Red Seas is an old dream. Evidence of attempts to construct such a seaway across the desert isthmus have been detected dating from Egypt’s pharaonic era and Persia under the rule of Darius. Venetian doges plotted, and Napoleon fervently wished for one, to save ships the 4,300-nautical mile diversion around Africa. When the 120-mile canal from Port Said to Suez was opened in 1869, the seafaring map underwent its most impactful change in history. The canal is at sea level, so no locks are required. Your ship will meet other ships of every sort and size from every corner of the globe around the entry at Port Said, to join one of the two southbound convoys allowed each day. The first starts from Port Said at half-past three in the morning, proceeding at a sedate 8 knots (to reduce erosion of the banks) and passing the single northbound convoy in the Great Bitter Lake. The second convoy leaves later, passing the northbound ships at the Bailah Bypass. On average, about 97 ships transit the canal each day. Sights during the transit tend toward the monotonous: the ship ahead and the one behind, and an endless bank of sand on either side, ceaselessly refreshed by dredges stationed along the shore and pumping wet sand over the berm. The town of Ismailia with its tall, minareted mosque is a welcome diversion, as are the two bridges and one massive powerline crossing the canal. The transit takes between 11 and 16 hours. At Suez, your ship passes into the Red Sea.
5

Transit The Suez Canal


A canal linking the Red Sea and Mediterranean is an old dream. Evidence of attempts to construct such a seaway across the desert isthmus have been detected dating from Egypt’s pharaonic era and Persia under the rule of Darius. Venetian doges plotted, and Napoleon fervently wished for one, to save ships the 4,300-nautical mile diversion around Africa. When the 120-mile canal between Suez and Port Said was opened in 1869, the seafaring map underwent its most impactful change in history. The canal is at sea level, so no locks are required. Your ship will meet other ships of every sort and size from every corner of the globe around the entry at Suez, to join a convoy. It starts early in the morning, proceeding in single file at a sedate 8 knots (to reduce erosion of the banks) and passing other convoys either in the Great Bitter Lake or at the Bailah Bypass. On average, about 97 ships transit the canal each day. Sights during the transit tend toward the monotonous: the ship ahead and the one behind, and an endless bank of sand on either side, ceaselessly refreshed by dredges stationed along the shore and pumping wet sand over the berm. The town of Ismailia with its tall, minareted mosque is a welcome diversion, as are the two bridges and one massive powerline crossing the canal. The transit takes between 11 and 16 hours.
5

Exit Suez Canal At Suez


Following a long full-day transit of the 120-mile, sea-level canal linking the Mediterranean with the Red Sea, your ship passes Suez and enters the Middle Eastern realm. Water flow at this end of the canal from the Great Bitter Lake is affected by the Red Sea tides. As your ship leaves the canal, you begin to detect the barely perceptible motion of the great sea beneath the hull, and the engine sound may accelerate slightly, heightening your anticipation. Raise your glass to another milestone passed, and to the exciting adventures that lie ahead.
6

Day At Sea


7

Aqaba (For Petra), Jordan


Aqaba is a sleepy fishing village with a long and historic past. At various times, the port was a stopover on ancient caravan routes, a garrison for Roman troops and meeting place for pilgrims en route to Mecca. Recent excavations have revealed a third-century church, one of the worlds oldest. In medieval times, Aqaba was an important part of Palestine before being absorbed into the Ottoman Empire, a time when Lawrence of Arabia figured in local history. Today Aqaba is important as Jordan’s only deep water port and the jumping-off point for excursions to Petra, the country’s premier historical attraction.
8-13

Days At Sea


A sophisticated sake capital, Niigata is an intoxicating, creative place of Japanese traditions and flavours. Learn of the many crafts and creativities that are practised here, from kite-making to alcohol fermentation and ceramic work, and immerse yourself in the beautiful coastline and waterfall-laced mountains of Niigata prefecture. The city evolves with each season, taking on a new appearance – whether it’s the thick layers of snow during winter, or the cherry blossoms of spring. Look out for the gorgeous curved black roof tiers of Shibata Castle, rising from a picturesque bed of pale-pink flowers. Sitting overlooking the Sea of Japan, out towards the intrigues of Sado Island, where the rare Toki bird – with its scythe-like beak – lives protected. This busy port city is famous for the high-quality and pure taste of its rice. As a result, sake produced here is among Japan’s finest, and distilleries will teach you the artistry behind its creation, and to appreciate the subtle flavours. Pia Bandai market is a bustling place to take a stroll and sip a morning coffee. Japan’s first public park, Hakusan Park was built in 1873 and is perfect for whiling away an afternoon, among drifting lotus flowers and swaying trees. Appreciate a magical tea ceremony in the Edo-era Shimizu-en Gardens, or savour the tranquillity of the peaceful Hakusan Shrine – dedicated to the god of marriage.
14

Muscat, Oman


Oman, “The Pearl of Mystic Arabia,” is one of the oldest civilizations on the Arabian Peninsula. Wedged between the Arabian Gulf and the Western Al Hajar Mountains, Muscat boasts an ancient history and rich Islamic heritage, evident in its prominent landmarks such as forts, castles, towers and mosques. Since the ascension of Qaboos bin Said as Sultan of Oman in 1970, Muscat has experienced rapid infrastructural development, leading to the growth of a vibrant economy and a multi-ethnic society.
15

Day At Sea


16

Sir Bani Yas Island, United Arab Emirates


Founded in 1971 by the founding President of the United Arab Emirates, Sheikh Zayid bin Sultan Al Nahyan, this ambitious visionary project is located on a natural island that has been occupied for centuries. There are over 40 archaeological sites on the island. One of the oldest is a Nestorian Christian monastery dating from 600 AD. Today Sir Bani Yas is a huge ecological experiment that explores “greening the desert” by re-introducing native and endangered species of Arabian flora and fauna. Over half the island is dedicated to the Arabian Wildlife Park. The island is a popular resort, where visitors indulge in active land and water sports and walk or drive to view the over 13,000 rare, free-roaming wild animals.
17

Dubai, United Arab Emirates


The United Arab Emirates is strategically located at the crossroads of East and West, and the traditional trading routes from Asia and the Far East to Europe and further afield are even more significant today than they were hundreds of years ago. Nestled at the very heart of the Islamic world, the country is unique in its embrace of the Western world. Here you can see the contrasts of the nomadic Bedouin people, and the opulence and splendor of the Sheiks, set against a backdrop of Western lifestyles.